STEAMINDEX
Latest update 20 September 2018

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Locomotive Magazine project
John Kitching's Game Cocks
KPJ: reference does not quite fit

Latest Archive (No. 98)

Trent & Mersey Canal
Penlee Quarry Railway

North British Study Group: latest
Ballochney Pugs (0-6-0STs)
also reprinting Stirling Everard articles from Locomotive
NISBET or NESBIT?

Locomotive types

Latest Backtrack: September 2018
Bodmer & balancing
> Bob Farmer's Index

NEWS:
George Behrend (luxury trains and Gone with Regret)
Latest Backtrack threw up this strange omission
E.A. Phillipson... Locomotive design and more"
Andrew Martin joins Canaries


Links to other websites
AMAZON is an impossible firm to deal with: use it at your peril

WHERE???


Review of British Transport Treasures
Latest releases:
Man behind the Treasures (Stuart Rankin)
PER RAIL (Great Central presentation to customers)
Further information

Stockton & Darlington Miscellany£3.95
Further information
Centenary in retrospect by Randall
Further information
Programme of ceremonies £2.95
Further information
The Construction of the Modern Locomotive, by George Hughes. Assistant in the Chief Mechanical Engineers Dept., Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. E. & F. N. Spon, 1894 Further information

The Story of the Royal Scot, London Midland and Scottish Railway, 1933. [ebook]
Further information

The Evolution of the Steam Locomotive, by G. A. Sekon, Railway Publishing Co. 1899 [ebook] £3.25p
Further information

The Manufacture of Locomotives and Other Munitions of War, 1914-1919 – The North British Locomotive Co. Ltd., n.d. but ca. 1920. [ebook]

GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY Special Centenary Number, Railway Gazette, 30 August 1935 [ebook]
Further information

Railways Archive
very useful site for source documents especially official accident reports

Magazine back issues
online service for single issues


Robert Humm of Stamford:
excellent secondhand specialist

Mike Field's index to Southern Railway articles

Transport non-connexions in Norfolk?

Donations & comments very gratefully received

Preservation organizations
National Railway Museum
Railway Preservation Society of Ireland
Newcomen Society
Heritage railways

Transport Ticket Society


Recent Transport Treasure

A History of the Great North of Scotland Railway. By Sir Malcolm Barclay-Harvey.

The Railways of England, by W.M. Acworth, John Murray 1889 [ebook]


Authorship
Ahrons
C.J. Allen
Phil Atkins
James Boyd
George & Andrew Dow
Ossie Nock
Brian Reed
Michael Rutherford
Glancey's Giants of steam

Books about locomotives

Author index

Journals (magazines) indexed

SEEING RED

NEWCOMEN SCAM


Graces Guide
See brief review

Journal Railway & Canal Historical Society

Whitaker: father & son: error
PROFESSIONAL MEMOIRS
Roland Bond
Cox of LMS/British Rail
Holcroft of GWR and Southern

Trevithick
Stephensons
Ramsbottom
   locomotives
Webb
   locomotves
Beyer
Worsdell
   NER locomotives
Matthew Kirtley

   Kirtley locomotives
Johnson
   Johnson locomotives

Churchward updated
   GWR locomotives
Holden
   GER locomotives
McIntosh
   Caledonian locomotives
Aspinall
   L&YR locomotives
Ivatt
   Ivatt locomotives
Gresley
   Gresley Pacifics

Ivatt
   Ivatt locomotives

Institution of Locomotive Engineers papers
Counter pressure tests on B17 (Robson paper)

Joy Diaries
Brian Reed
P.C. Dewhurst (PCD)
Cloud anthology

Hugh Le Fleming: artist

Digel Digby: locomotive liveries

Jonathan Clay's Locomotive portraits

John Knowles: Steam locomotive resistance

Adrian Tester & the 4F & more Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Trevithick: update
Beeching, Marples and Serpell
and
Harold Wilson (the real villain?)

Locomotive Performance & Efficiency Bulletins (BTC)

Tuplin: eccentric index entries

Sean O'Brien's Train Songs published Faber: acquired Holt Book Shop in Easter Week

Sean O'Brien's view from the train:
we travel through time as well as space on a train

Joy Diaries
Joynt's Inchicore
Chronology of locomotive history
Reed's 150 years
John Wilson
ARLE designs
WANTED Information about W. Wells: who was he?
And qualifications of contributors to Backtrack on locomotive design

Irish locomotives

Midland Record
Any hope of borrowing some of later Issues?

St. Andrews


Biographies: British locomotive designers
Sir Nigel Gresley
George & Robert Stephenson
David Wardale
Inspecting Officers
Engine drivers Verena Holmes
Publishers
Railway enthusiasts: are they an endangered species?

Loco Driver (excellent pictures & captions)
Six Bells Junction [rail tours]

Carscapes: very good book: further info

Train times (UK)

Cheap train tickets

Alternative service at Seat 61
Train Songs

Visual materials

Other images including Bloomer

Kevin Jones

search engine

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Use control "F" to find material within files
Not found? Failure may be due to spelling or typing error
The name indexes (below) are often helpful
Surnames beginning A-D
Surnames beginning E-J
Surnames beginning K-Q
Surnames beginning R-Z

Locomotive class index
A1X to Z1, also 0F to 9F and 68XX
Individual locomotives
Shannon and St Martin, so far
Corporate name index
Includes names like Sharp Stewart

Locomotive design

Stanier the man


Still puzzled??"
Not found? Improvements?:
steamindex@steamindex.com [KPJ having problems with BT CONNECT - an inept name! Problems with website please contact:
Webmaster: kevinjonesrunton@gmail.com who unlike RAC, British Telecom, etc he responds to his e-mails
Last Railway Archive (No. 50)

Hull & Barnsley and broad gauge 4-4-0Ts

Last Great Western Railway J.

Gas turbines


Railway World

LMS Journal

Railways South East

British Railway Journal

Reference books

Libraries and their demise in Norfolk
Bookshops
publishers?


Frank Jones's diaries

Greaves index of private owner wagons

EARLY MAIN LINE conference Proceedings

Architects in new location






*****

NEWS




Review of British Transport Treasures
Dad’s briefcase formed my introduction to railway literature. The two most regular items were the orange-covered and rather dull Railway Gazette and the slightly less dull Modern Transport. Both contained occasional items of interest. Hidden in odd cases of the case there might be more exciting items like the publicity material prepared for the LNER streamlined trains and one especially memorable item from the LMS a frontal view of a streamlined Pacific with doors which opened to reveal the smokebox, or was it text? It was the opening doors which impressed.
Remarkably some of these items still form part of a chaotic personal collection: these include all of George Dow’s histories, On Either Side and the Nock booklets to “celebrate” Thompson’s standard classes. On Either Side contains a remarkable map of the LNER’s main lines to Scotland, Manchester and East Anglia: the last terminating in Yarmouth with Norwich being served by a network of branch lines.
On Either Side has recently been reprinted, but many of these items are now available to download from the British Transport Treasures website for modest cost. They range from single page publicity items to quite substantial books: and prices range from about 50 pence to £5. The latter include most of Dow’s histories published by the LNER: these must have been a difficult task to scan as extensive use was made of flimsy folded pages for diagrams and tabulations. A few quite substantial books with hard covers are also available notably Bird’s Locomotives of the Great Northern Railway, Chapman’s Twixt rail and sea (a Great Western publication) and Burtt’s classic The Locomotives of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway of 1903.
Limited sampling is provided; and there are the usual basket and check-out facilities. A percentage of the takings is given to Help for Heroes. It appears to be an excellent method of building up a collection of railway literature without the problems of physical storage.

The Transport Ticket Society.
The Transport Ticket Society marks its creation 50 years ago by offering 2014 membership at a discounted rate of £12.50 (UK), £22.50 (overseas), representing a cut of about 50% on its previous rates. The Society, formed in 1964 through the amalgamation of two similar societies, has a long history of researching and studying tickets and fare collection systems. Today the development of electronic forms of ticket issue for many forms of transport presents different challenges and opportunities to operators and enthusiasts alike. The Society provides members with an extensively illustrated, monthly Journal, which includes wide-ranging news of ticket matters for all modes of transport in the UK and abroad, along with historical articles relating to tickets and issuing systems from times past. Monthly distributions of road, rail and other tickets are offered to members and twice-yearly postal auctions of historic tickets are held. Meetings take place regularly in Manchester and Brighton together with other venues from time to time. For further information and an application form, visit the Society's website www.transport-ticket.org.uk or contact the Membership Secretary at 6 Breckbank, Forest Town, Mansfield NG19 OPZ (stephenskeavington@msn.com).


Links to other relevant websites

AVAILABLE LAST MONTH FROM BRITISH TRANSPORT TREASURES

Per Rail (Great Central Railway)

This very scarce publication describes, and illustrates in detail, how an Edwardian railway handled all classes of freight traffic, from coal to fresh fish – locomotives, rolling stock, depots, warehouses, docks, cranes, shunting, manually and by capstan, staff and uniforms, also road collection and delivery services. 
Even the cautious Ottley (5771) was forced into noting its luxurious format.
A “must read” for anyone interested in the history of the Great Central, or for railway modellers seeking to accurately represent the working of a pre-Great War railway. It was in part a celebration. Just over a decade earlier, financially exhausted by the cost of extending the line to London, few would have predicted that the Great Central would provide fast express sevices, using carriages amongst the most comfortable in the Kingdom, through trains between the NE and SW parts of the country, run 60 mph fish trains with automatic brakes, build a vast marshalling yard at Wath-upon-Dearne, and a new port on the Humber.
“Per Rail” is probably the most sumptuous publication ever issued by as British railway to promote its services. Every aspect is of the highest quality – paper, type setting, presentation of illustrations, layout design and binding. It was in part a celebration. Just over a decade earlier, financially exhausted by the cost of extending the line to London, few would have predicted that the Great Central would provide comfortable passenger services, including, through trains between the NE and SW parts of the country, would run 60 mph fish trains with automatic brakes, build Wath-upon-Dearne marshalling yard for the efficient handling handling of millions of tons of coal traffic to London, or for export; the exports went through a large modern port, which the GCR had built at Immingham, complete with coal bunkering equipment, graving docks and a passenger station for steamer services to the Continent. The GCR was also in the fore front of other technical developments, including power operated and colour light signalling. Although the GCR was still unable to pay a dividend on its ordinary shares, it was a remarkable achievement, by a first class team of officers and managers, led by Chairman Sir Alexander Henderson and newly knighted (at the opening of Immingham Docks) General Manager, Sir Sam Fay. Henderson, a brilliant financier and businessman, with extensive interests in South America, steered the GCR through some very shallow financial waters, while Fay, one of the outstanding railway managers of the age, provided the ideas and the flair. One imagines being a fly on the wall at a GCR board meeting. Fay has just announced his latest scheme, and a quiet plaintive voice from an elderly Director is heard “But where is the money to come from?”
There is a murmur from the others, studiously avoiding the Chairman’s eye. Sir Alexander has worked miracles before… hopefully he will do so again!

“The Ways of Our Railways” benefits from being by a professional journalist with a railway background, and by including contributions and advice from active Railway Officers and engineers.

The Construction of the Modern Locomotive, by George Hughes. Assistant in the Chief Mechanical Engineers Dept., Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. E. & F. N. Spon, 1894 Price: £4.55
Hard back book, maroon cloth, gilt embossed title, 9in. x 5.75in., 261pp., plus adverts, Large folding steel engraving of Aspinall 0-6-0 No. 1026. Large cross section engraving of same. There are 310 figures of tools, components and partly completed locos in the text. Tipped in frontispiece portrait of author.

Review of British Transport Treasures
Dad’s briefcase formed my introduction to railway literature. The two most regular items were the orange-covered and rather dull Railway Gazette and the slightly less dull Modern Transport. Both contained occasional items of interest. Hidden in odd corners of the case there might be more exciting items like the publicity material prepared for the LNER streamlined trains and one especially memorable item from the LMS a frontal view of a streamlined Pacific with doors which opened to reveal the smokebox, or was it text? It was the opening doors which impressed.
Remarkably some of these items still form part of a chaotic personal collection: these include all of George Dow’s histories, On Either Side and the Nock booklets to “celebrate” Thompson’s standard classes. On Either Side contains a remarkable map of the LNER’s main lines to Scotland, Manchester and East Anglia: the last terminating in Yarmouth with Norwich being served by a network of branch lines.
On Either Side has recently been reprinted, but many of these items are now available to download from the British Transport Treasures website for modest cost. They range from single page publicity items to quite substantial books: and prices range from about 50 pence to £5. The latter include most of Dow’s histories published by the LNER: these must have been a difficult task to scan as extensive use was made of flimsy folded pages for diagrams and tabulations. A few quite substantial books with hard covers are also available notably Bird’s Locomotives of the Great Northern Railway, Chapman’s Twixt rail and sea (a Great Western publication) and Burtt’s classic The Locomotives of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway of 1903.
Limited sampling is provided; and there are the usual basket and check-out facilities. A percentage of the takings is given to Help for Heroes. It appears to be an excellent method of building up a collection of railway literature without the problems of physical storage. The collection is always growing; and its creator, Stuart Rankine, a retired railway officer, is a frequent contributor of e-mails, most recently about bloomers committed by Hamilton Ellis on his carriage panel painting of a Bloomer. He has now scanned Pettigrew's Manual of locomotive engineering. 3rd edition. London: Griffin. 1909. 356pp with many illustrations and it deserves to be added to many collections.
Recent additions include Sekon's excellent late Victorian history of the stream locomotive (an excellent counter-balance to Stretton's questionable history published a little later and the beautiful book of LMS posters which includes the work of Norman Wilkinson published before the Company imposed an austerity regime.
GWR Centenary
Paper covered magazine supplement,13”x 10”, pp. 64,numerous illutrations,maps, plans and Art Deco adverts by suppliers and contractors to the GWR. There were three main ”Railway Centenaries” celebrated between the two World Wars. In 1925, the London & North Eastern Railway held the “The Railway Centenary” celebrating the opening of the Stockton & Darligton in 1825, which it claimed as its ancestor (albeit by “marriage” in 1863) and implying that it was the “First Railway In The World” which it was not. There were some 1500 miles of primitive railway, some even using iron rail, in Britain by1800, but not of course worked by locomotives. These were basically private lines limited to one user – coal mine, quarry, etc. The first railway for public use, the Surrey Iron Railway for goods traffic, obtained its Act of Parliament in 1801, while the first successful long term use of steam locomotives began on the Middleton Colliery Railway near Leeds, in 1812. The first passenger trains were not steam hauled on the S&D until the 1830s, this innovation began on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway in when it opened in1830, As a descendant, also by amalgamation, this centenary was marked by the London Midland & Scottish Railway in 1930 as “The Centenary of Railways” just as misleading a title. The Great Western was sometimes rather ambivalent about its heritage. In 1921, with nationalisation, or takeover by another company possible threats, it commissioned and published a monumental two-volume history from an accomplished writer, E. T. MacDermot. Yet in 1906, it had calmly scrapped two priceless broad gauge locomotive relics,”North Star” of 1837and “Lord of the Isles” of 1851. because the vast Swindon Works was “short of space”. It was also reticent about where the sudden excess of surplus cash arose in Bristol, which went a long way towards funding the first stages of the railway. It came in fact from the cash compensation paid by the government to Bristol owners of slave worked estates in the Carribean,when slavery was finally abolished in the colonies.

York Conference
Following the success of the first International Early Main Line Railways Conference in 2014, the organising committee has arranged a second conference to explore further the origin and development of main line railways between 1830 and c1870.
This reflects the all-important years when railways first developed routes and networks and became major contributors to economic growth around the world, made possible by rapid advances in civil and mechanical engineering techniques. This second conference has attracted papers from authors studying subjects in several parts of the world, in addition to the United Kingdom. They cover subjects related to economic and political progress and business incentive and practice, as well as developments in structural, architectural and building techniques and practice and advancements in materials.
The conference is sponsored by: The Institution of Civil Engineers, The Newcomen Society, The Institute of Railway Studies and Transport History in York, The Railway and Canal Historical Society.
The Conference will be held in York — major railway junction, created in the 1840s by George Hudson. Fast trains from London King's Cross take under two hours.
The conference sessions will take place in the National Railway Museum.
It will commence on Thursday evening, 21 June, with a public lecture by Andrew Savage, Executive Director of the Railway Heritage Trust. Conference papers will be presented during Friday and Saturday, and on Sunday morning until lunchtime. They will present new and previously unpublished research, and the timetable will allow generous time for questions and discussion.
Rooms have been reserved at the Park Inn, York.Arrangements are being made for a chartered trip on the preserved North Yorkshire Moors Railway, with supper served on board. On Saturday evening a formal conference dinner will take place in the Station Hall of the National Railway Museum.
The conference website and facility for on- line bookings is http://www.rchs.org.uk/early- main-line-railways-conference/ Enquiries or queries specific to booking and payment should be sent to emlc2bookings@ rchs.org.uk (or to the above address). Queries about the conference itself should be sent to emir 2.2018@gmail.com John New, Transport Historian